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-Immunisations & Lots Of Answered Questions-

by Kelly Enos on October 01, 2020

Immunizations typically start from 8 weeks after your baby has been born. I'm going to give you some of our top tips on how to prepare yourself and your baby to get through the first year of immunizations.

Tip #1 Prepare yourself. If you need to, give the doctors a ring and speak to the immunisation nurse prior to the appointment. They will be happy to answer any questions you have regarding; how long the jab/jabs will take, what the common side effects are, how many injections the baby will receive and what the immunisation is protecting them from? I found this really helpful and it allowed me to understand the process a little bit more. This way I didn't feel like I was going in blind sighted, it generally put me at ease and made me feel much more prepared.

Tip #2; Prepare your baby. Make sure that prior to the injections you have a bottle of Calpol ready to help with any pain and any high temperature caused by the injection. If you are unsure as to which Calpol to buy, speak to the pharmacist, explain what they're going to have done and how old they are and they will tell you which Calpol is recommended. As far as clothing is concerned dependent on the type of immunisation your baby is having, I would recommend loose clothing, or even something that you don't have to take off in order for the immunisation to be done. I mean, let's face it dressing a cranky baby is not fun for anybody.

Tip #3: Prepare Each other. Make sure that you are packed and ready to go at least an hour before with the essentials such as a bottle of milk, the red book, a dummy or if your child is a little bit older a special snack.  This way you will find that you are not stressing about getting to there on time and you feel more in control and ready for the appointment.  

No one likes to take their baby for that immunizations I'm not going lie it's not a nice appointment. When you get in to the room you will be told again exactly what's going to happen. You will also be told to hold your baby accordingly so that the nurse can administer the injection. My biggest tip here is to look away, put your head on to babies head and look away with them, keep talking to them, reassuring them “it's okay” or a gentle “shh” is all they need. When your baby does cry especially for that first injection it's really hard to hear, it is a cry you might not of heard before. Again, another TOP TIP is when the injection is over and the plaster is on is to hold your baby in tightly, stand up and walk away from the nurse. Just gently bouncing them up and down and talking to them. George reacted really well with this and after a few seconds was back to his normal self.

After his 12 month injections I even took him to the window and showed him the cars outside to distract him from the pain. If your baby is having their 12 month immunizations (this includes four injections one after another). This is not only hard for your baby to go through but it is also hard for you to go through. Remember, as I always say make sure you do everything how YOU want it to go. For instance after the first 2 jabs were administered to Georges left arm and left leg, I asked for a break just to let him calm down, take a breather, have a cuddle and then go on to the next two injections in the right arm and the right leg. So if you have more than one injection you can ask for breaks in the middle tell them that you just want to cuddle them for a second and then get back to it don't be scared to ask for this. They are more than happy to do whatever makes you and your baby as comfortable as possible.

After the injections you'll find that your baby might be sleepy, a little bit cranky and just want cuddles. Make sure you keep an eye on their temperature and give them Calpol as often as the doctor has required. If at any point you are concerned about your baby after their injections don't hesitate to ring the doctor and check that everything is normal. We did it quite a few times and it helped to reassure us.  

Just remember it’s a short-term pain for a long-term gain. You’ll both be fine, and you’ll get through it together.

Thank you once again for reading.

See you in the next one!

With Love,

Kelly & George x

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